The ‘Giant of Africa” boast 2 UNESCO World heritage sites that are a testaments to its cultural significance to the continent. Come check them out with us!

 

The Osun-Osogbo Sacred Grove

 

Established over 400 years ago in Osun state on the outskirts its capital Osogbo, this sacred grove is the largest to have survived the ages and the largest remaining high tropical forest in southern Nigeria. The Osun-Osogbo Sacred Grove covers an area of 75 hectares and is revered as the dwelling place of Osun, the Yoruba goddess of fertility. The Osun River cuts across the forest, with shrines, sanctuaries and sculptures dotted along its course. It has five main divisions, devoted to different Yoruba deities, and nine specific worship points along the river.

 

Osun-Osogbo Grove

Osun-Osogbo Grove

 

Long ago, it was a widespread practice amongst the Yoruba people to maintain an area of intact forest for ritual purposes close to every settlement. Their disappearance over time has made Osun-Osogbo an important reference point for Yoruba identity and the Yoruba diaspora. The historic landscape remains a place of worship and plays host to an annual festival.

 

The Sukur Cultural Landscape

 

Sukur is located in Madagali local government area of Adamawa state of Nigeria along Nigeria/ Cameroon border, some 290 km from Yola. The landscape is characterized by terraces on the farmlands, dry stone structures and stone paved walkways in includes a remarkable combination of intensive and extensive farming. This ancient settlement has a recorded history of iron smelting technology, flourishing trade, and strong political institution dating back to the 16th century.

 

Sukur Cultural Landscape

Sukur Cultural Landscape

The area has been under essentially the same form of land management for at least 400 years, under the Dur dynasty of chiefs.  Local granite has been used to build terraced fields (which are invested with a spiritual significance with sacred trees and ritual sites), and defensive dry stone walls around homesteads. The area has a long tradition of iron smelting, and village architecture reflects the prevailing social hierarchy, the most prominent set of buildings being the Hidi (chief) Palace located on a hilltop overlooking the rest of the village.

 

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