On 18th & 19th July, I completed a 48 hour Instagram takeover in Namibia on the Visiter L’Afrique platform. Here is a summary: “They call it Africa, we call it home.” I start by sharing this photo of a hut in my village. An interesting fact is that in Namibia, most of the youth still have strong ties to their villages where their parents, grandparents and ancestors originate from.

Although many of the youth migrated to the big city, the average Namibian youth would go to the village every December holiday to visit parents/relatives that reside there and this also keeps the vilage running. Although traditions and certain cultural norms have become modernized, there is still a strong sense of roots.

 

visiterlafrique namibia

 

visiterlafrique namibia

 

Sometimes when I am in Windhoek CBD and want something quick to eat, I stop by a food truck closest to me and order a hotdog. One hotdog is priced at N$ 15 = U$ 1.1
Food trucks are clearly very convenient and affordable and have thus become very common in Windhoek!
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The beautifully built Christuskirche (German for (‘Christ church’) is a historic landmark & Lutheran church in Windhoek. The church was officially open in 1910 by a German government architect after the wars between the Germans and the native tribes of Khoikhoi, Herero and Owambo. The church is often booked for weddings and funerals.
VISITERLAFRIQUE NAMIBIA
This is an easy meal that I often love to eat & cook; Pap (maize meal – which is a staple food in Namibia), canned pilchards and ‘5 years spinach’/Kale.
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This is a woman from the Himba tribe of Namibia. This Himba tribe is probably the most interesting & fascinating tribe in Namibia. I say so because it is the only tribe in Namibia that has widely not adopted to modernity, even whilst living in the city. This tribe is often photographed by/with tourists and have now started placing fees for pictures… as it should be.

VISITERLAFRIQUE NAMIBIA

 

VISITERLAFRIQUE NAMIBIA

 

VISITERLAFRIQUE NAMIBIA

Just like other African countries, the informal economy has grown substantially in Namibia. Below/next to the (Windhoek) Hilton Hotel is one of the places where one can see an area with the sign that reads “INFORMAL TRADERS ONLY” designated for informal traders. Among other traders, there are Himba women there that sell crafts like bracelets made out of steel which I bought in order to gain consent to take pictures and because it is unique and très cool!
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This is called ‘Kapana’ beef that is grilled on open fire, wrapped in newspaper and sprinkled with ‘Kapana spice’ but the best way to eat it is when it is burning hot on the grill. Kapana is sold in the townships and is most popular at the ‘Single Quarters’ market in Windhoek. Most people have Kapana with salsa sauce and pap or vetcakes (beignets with no topping, for French speakers).
“You have not been to Namibia if you did not try Kapana” – is what we (Namibians) would say.
VISITERLAFRIQUE NAMIBIA
Here I am drinking a proudly non-alcoholic Namibian drink, Vigo (Marula flavor). It has great energizing flavor & is a must try!
namibia visiterlafrique
Creativity; The traders at Single Quarters market use small empty bottles of Richelieu brandy to insert chili and sell it so.
visiterlafrique namibia
Food is a universal language;
Many countries eat this in similar ways but have different ways of calling it by language. It is called ‘Kapenta’ in my native language, Subiya from the Zambezi region of Namibia. This basket is also found at Single Quarters market.
See my next article on Xwama traditional restaurant.