In 2003, Gabon made the declaration to dedicate 10% of the total land to conservation and land protection. The results… 13 gorgeous national parks as far as the eye can see. Specifically, the Loango National Park! Along its Atlantic coastline, in the western part of Gabon.

 

A collate of multiple habitats, including savannahs, beaches, thick forests & swamps, and mangroves & lagoons. Finding such an ecosystem elsewhere is rare. The national park is 1,500 hectares and extends into the Atlantic. It was classed as a protected conservation site by the World Conservation Union. It is famous for the various species within the park. After South Africa, it is said to have the largest population and variety of whales and dolphins.

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Getting to the Park:

It is difficult to get to the park using road transportation, as infrastructure is still up and coming around Gabon. The nearest town from Loango is Port Gentil, a short 30 minutes flight to Port Gentil is the best option.

 

From Port Gentil, hiring a car allows for flexibility and freedom to discover other hidden gems on the way to Iguela or accommodation near the National Park. However, getting to Iguela requires a permit, due to controversial construction going on along the way to Iguela.

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The National Park allows for different activities once there. Once inside, the contrast of lush green vegetation, against charcoal black water is spectacular. Given the various species of wildlife in the park the activities are endless. The activities are organised in collaboration with conservation societies, which operate in the park, and the park’s authorities to ensure no harm befalls the animals. Some of our favourites include tracking gorillas, watching the surfing hippos, speedboats around the inner depths of the parks and lagoons.

 

Due to the nature of the national park, measures go into ensuring the health and safety found in the Park. At times, visitors are asked to wear masks to avoid transmitting diseases, and protective clothing (when in the swamps, beware of leeches).